Khoa Do is a filmmaker, speaker, entrepreneur and social justice advocate who is passionate about storytelling, new technologies and diversity.

As a speaker, Khoa has delivered over 400 keynote presentations across three continents, speaking on an array of subjects including leadership and resilience. His clients have included Fortune 500 companies such as Microsoft, IBM, Citigroup and Colgate-Palmolive.

As a social justice advocate, Khoa spent years working with homeless and at-risk youths, refugees from many different backgrounds and former prisoners. His work in these areas led to Khoa being awarded the Young Citizen of the Year Award, the Young Vietnamese-Australian of the Year Award and Australia's most significant award for anyone under thirty, the Young Australian of the Year Award.

As a board member, Khoa has held a position on two of Australia's most prominent media and arts boards. He was a member of Australia's Advertising Standards Board for nearly a decade and currently sits on the board of the Australia Council for the Arts, the most powerful arts board in Australia.

As an entrepreneur, Khoa is an investor on early stage startups which promote authentic storytelling, greater accessibility and diversity.

As a filmmaker, Khoa has received accolades in both film and television. Beginning his career in 2000, Khoa's first screenplay, for the short drama "Delivery Day", saw him receive his first AFI Award nomination. The drama subsequently won awards at festivals worldwide including at Palm Springs, Berlin and Locarno International Film Festivals.

His first feature three years later, "The Finished People", which Khoa wrote, directed and produced on a micro-budget, saw him become the youngest director in Australian history to be nominated for an AFI Award for Best Director. Khoa's film, which he co-wrote with at-risk youths in western Sydney, was nominated for three Film Critic's Circle of Australia Awards, an AWGIE Award and an ADG Award.

Over the years he has continued to write, direct and produce indie films which address contemporary social issues such as "Mother Fish" working with Vietnamese refugees and their descendants, and "Falling for Sahara" working with African refugees from Somalia, Sudan, Ethiopia and Eritrea.

In 2013 and 2014, he worked on two dramas that address the effects of imprisonment and incarceration including the telemovie "Schapelle" which Khoa directed, and the multi award-winning mini series "Better Man" which Khoa wrote and directed. "Better Man" questions the validity of capital punishment in the modern age and is currently available on Netflix.

As a speaker, Khoa has delivered over 400 keynote presentations across three continents, speaking on an array of subjects including leadership and resilience. His clients have included Fortune 500 companies such as Microsoft, IBM, Citigroup and Colgate-Palmolive.

As a social justice advocate, Khoa spent years working with homeless and at-risk youths, refugees from many different backgrounds and former prisoners. His work in these areas lead to Khoa being awarded the Young Citizen of the Year Award, the Young Vietnamese-Australian of the Year Award and Australia's most significant award for anyone under thirty, the Young Australian of the Year Award.

As a board member, Khoa has held a position on two of Australia's most prominent media and arts boards. He was a member of Australia's Advertising Standards Board for nearly a decade and currently sits on the board of the Australia Council for the Arts, the most powerful arts board in Australia.

As an entrepreneur, Khoa is an investor on early stage startups which promote authentic storytelling, greater accessibility and diversity.

As a filmmaker, Khoa has received accolades in both film and television. Beginning his career in 2000, Khoa's first screenplay, for the short drama "Delivery Day", saw him receive his first AFI Award nomination. The drama subsequently won awards at festivals worldwide including at Palm Springs, Berlin and Locarno International Film Festivals.

His first feature three years later, "The Finished People", which Khoa wrote, directed and produced on a micro-budget, saw him become the youngest director in Australian history to be nominated for an AFI Award for Best Director. Khoa's film, which he co-wrote with at-risk youths in western Sydney, was nominated for three Film Critic's Circle of Australia Awards, an AWGIE Award and an ADG Award.

Over the years he has continued to write, direct and produce indie films which address contemporary social issues such as "Mother Fish" working with Vietnamese refugees and their descendants, and "Falling for Sahara" working with African refugees from Somalia, Sudan, Ethiopia and Eritrea.

In 2013 and 2014, he worked on two dramas that address the effects of imprisonment and incarceration including the telemovie "Schapelle" which Khoa directed, and the multi award-winning mini series "Better Man" which Khoa wrote and directed. "Better Man" questions the validity of capital punishment in the modern age and is currently available on Netflix.

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